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Championship Productions Featured Items!

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    WRD-05253A:

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Have you ever had a wrestler in on a single leg and couldn't finish? How about giving up on a return to the mat, which resulted in a stall call or giving up a point? Now's the time for your wrestlers to win those positions! Matches can be won or lost by just one point, and this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches.

    In this video, Chris Bono brings his national and international experience together to help you develop your wrestlers in these must-win positions. He shows you 10 must-win positions from the neutral position and the techniques to master these positions to become champions. The techniques and drills in this video will ensure your wrestlers compete at a high level once mastered.

    Finish 100% of the time when getting to a leg and getting it in the air.

    Your wrestlers must be able to finish when they get to the opponent's leg. Why would you want to work hard for 5 or 6 minutes to get to your opponent's leg once, then not be able to finish? Bono shows the proper technique in securing the single leg, and three ways to finish a single leg depending on how your opponent reacts. He also demonstrates how to score from a single when your opponent is trying to get off the mat or use the edge.

    Finish when in on a high crotch.

    Win the high-crotch crackdown position every time! Bono demonstrates small details to help your wrestlers score from four different high crotch positions that they'll end up in with regularity. Develop the skills needed to beat the wrestler who likes to sit the corner or crotch lift.

    Additionally, you'll get a knee slide drill that is essential for the high crotch.

    Win when in the dominant position from a standing front headlock.

    The front headlock is one of the most common positions in wrestling and one of the most common stalemated positions. Bono emphasizes proper head and hand position with this technique, showing how to control your opponent in order to get to their leg with a jab step.

    Beat your opponent's control ties.

    Coach Bono shows how to clear a two-on one and an underhook. He not only shows how to clear these ties, but how to transition directly into a tilt or capture the wrist.

    Win the rear standing position.

    Master the art of getting your opponent off his feet. Bono teaches ways to return the wrestler back to the mat that don't involve a lot of muscle to get the job done. He also shows how to get back points on the return.

    Coach Bono ends the video showing easy techniques to counter the single leg and body locks.

    This video addresses so many positions that tend to result in stalemates, conceding, or going out of bounds. Matches can be won or lost by just one point; this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches!

    57 minutes. 2017.



    WRD-05253B:

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Wrestlers miss or give up too many points in positions they can win. This video is a must for coaches tired of seeing their wrestlers leave points on the mat.

    Chris Bono walks through 10 must-win positions, focusing mainly on defensive positions that you must win. He breaks down the moves and covers every step in detail, adding drills along the way to master the positions. These are positions that are common problems for wrestlers.

    Crackdown Position and Beating a Leg Pass

    The crackdown is one of the most technical positions in wrestling, so learning how to win this position both offensively and defensively is essential. Coach Bono shows how to bump your opponent and get your leg back.

    A leg pass off a low single is rapidly becoming fundamental technique in wrestling. Learning the counter to counter game is now must-know material. Bono gives you a basic counter and shows how to use a back hook to complete the takedown.

    Single Leg Sprawl Counter and Returning to the Mat

    Coach Bono demonstrates three different finishes when your opponent sprawls. One of these finishes leads to back points from a Navy Ride, a solid, rarely seen move.

    If your wrestlers are tired of getting to their feet just to get returned, then learn how to land "like a cat" on all fours and knee slide in order to explode back to your feet and gain the advantage.

    Leg Defense and Defeating a Shin Whizzer

    The next two positions that Bono discuses are the shin whizzer defense and leg defense. Both of these positions can be difficult to defend. He shows two ways to defend the shin whizzer and four different ways to defend legs. Develop the skills to get the defensive pin or to get the escape.

    Win the Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a staple of Coach Bono's program. He demonstrates how he gets opponents out of position and how to score from the front headlock. See how to win this position from both top and bottom:

    • Master control with the chin and armpit to keep your opponent down and score on top.
    • Learn to stay strong on the bottom to win this position, whether your opponent locks hands or not.

    Coach Bono covers many common positions that wrestlers struggle with and shows how to rectify these problems. This is a great video to help your team get to the next level!

    53 minutes. 2017.




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    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Wrestlers miss or give up too many points in positions they can win. This video is a must for coaches tired of seeing their wrestlers leave points on the mat.

    Chris Bono walks through 10 must-win positions, focusing mainly on defensive positions that you must win. He breaks down the moves and covers every step in detail, adding drills along the way to master the positions. These are positions that are common problems for wrestlers.

    Crackdown Position and Beating a Leg Pass

    The crackdown is one of the most technical positions in wrestling, so learning how to win this position both offensively and defensively is essential. Coach Bono shows how to bump your opponent and get your leg back.

    A leg pass off a low single is rapidly becoming fundamental technique in wrestling. Learning the counter to counter game is now must-know material. Bono gives you a basic counter and shows how to use a back hook to complete the takedown.

    Single Leg Sprawl Counter and Returning to the Mat

    Coach Bono demonstrates three different finishes when your opponent sprawls. One of these finishes leads to back points from a Navy Ride, a solid, rarely seen move.

    If your wrestlers are tired of getting to their feet just to get returned, then learn how to land "like a cat" on all fours and knee slide in order to explode back to your feet and gain the advantage.

    Leg Defense and Defeating a Shin Whizzer

    The next two positions that Bono discuses are the shin whizzer defense and leg defense. Both of these positions can be difficult to defend. He shows two ways to defend the shin whizzer and four different ways to defend legs. Develop the skills to get the defensive pin or to get the escape.

    Win the Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a staple of Coach Bono's program. He demonstrates how he gets opponents out of position and how to score from the front headlock. See how to win this position from both top and bottom:

    • Master control with the chin and armpit to keep your opponent down and score on top.
    • Learn to stay strong on the bottom to win this position, whether your opponent locks hands or not.

    Coach Bono covers many common positions that wrestlers struggle with and shows how to rectify these problems. This is a great video to help your team get to the next level!

    53 minutes. 2017.


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    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Have you ever had a wrestler in on a single leg and couldn't finish? How about giving up on a return to the mat, which resulted in a stall call or giving up a point? Now's the time for your wrestlers to win those positions! Matches can be won or lost by just one point, and this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches.

    In this video, Chris Bono brings his national and international experience together to help you develop your wrestlers in these must-win positions. He shows you 10 must-win positions from the neutral position and the techniques to master these positions to become champions. The techniques and drills in this video will ensure your wrestlers compete at a high level once mastered.

    Finish 100% of the time when getting to a leg and getting it in the air.

    Your wrestlers must be able to finish when they get to the opponent's leg. Why would you want to work hard for 5 or 6 minutes to get to your opponent's leg once, then not be able to finish? Bono shows the proper technique in securing the single leg, and three ways to finish a single leg depending on how your opponent reacts. He also demonstrates how to score from a single when your opponent is trying to get off the mat or use the edge.

    Finish when in on a high crotch.

    Win the high-crotch crackdown position every time! Bono demonstrates small details to help your wrestlers score from four different high crotch positions that they'll end up in with regularity. Develop the skills needed to beat the wrestler who likes to sit the corner or crotch lift.

    Additionally, you'll get a knee slide drill that is essential for the high crotch.

    Win when in the dominant position from a standing front headlock.

    The front headlock is one of the most common positions in wrestling and one of the most common stalemated positions. Bono emphasizes proper head and hand position with this technique, showing how to control your opponent in order to get to their leg with a jab step.

    Beat your opponent's control ties.

    Coach Bono shows how to clear a two-on one and an underhook. He not only shows how to clear these ties, but how to transition directly into a tilt or capture the wrist.

    Win the rear standing position.

    Master the art of getting your opponent off his feet. Bono teaches ways to return the wrestler back to the mat that don't involve a lot of muscle to get the job done. He also shows how to get back points on the return.

    Coach Bono ends the video showing easy techniques to counter the single leg and body locks.

    This video addresses so many positions that tend to result in stalemates, conceding, or going out of bounds. Matches can be won or lost by just one point; this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches!

    57 minutes. 2017.


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    with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    Practice is where the most development happens in your wrestlers. As a coach, it's important to understand how to structure your practices throughout the season in a way that helps your athletes peak at the right time, so they can maximize their success at the end of the year during regional and conference tournaments.

    A distinguishing characteristic of the St Cloud Huskies' practice sessions is the simple, effective coaching style of Steve Costanzo. You will see that he encourages his athletes to stick to high-percentage moves throughout their training; moves that you will be able to observe and apply to your own training or coaching.

    Phase 1: Pre-Season (Disc 1 & 2)

    Beginning mid-October through mid-December, Coach Costanzo and his staff introduce their training system to wrestlers and focus primarily on building core technique and integrating those skills during longer, intense live wrestling sessions. Practices start with a dynamic warm up consisting of a combination of calisthenics, band exercise and wrestling drills.

    During the first practice, Coach Costanzo and his staff review the bent leg turk series and cradle series, while also illustrating how to build up to intense live wrestling sessions through stance and motion drills and 80/50 movement drills. The 80/50 drill is used to develop confidence in a wrestler's takedowns and hand fighting skills. It teaches wrestlers to get to an angle so they can effectively attack the legs. It also teaches wrestlers how to transition from hand fighting to leg attacks.

    In the second practice, Coach Costanzo walks us through a 90-minute pre-season wrestling practice that's a little unconventional because live wrestling is done in the first half of practice and the technical side of things is focused on at the end. Match length and live go's can last anywhere from 15 minutes to 45 minutes. Costanzo explains that he gets the team to focus on a grinding type of training during phase one, typically lasting no more than 90 minutes.

    Drills focus on specific wrestling skills, such as the bull ride drill, to work on wrestlers' riding skills and the Abas roll and scrambling drill to work on leg passes and the ability to wrestle through all types of positions and scenarios.

    The last half of practice focuses on live situational wrestling and learning a cradle series. Assistant coach Brady Wilson shows the Huskie approach to breaking someone down, and how he splits the back into three parts. First, Wilson shows how to use this knowledge to successfully break the bottom man down, so the top wrestler can successfully start their cradle series. From there, Wilson goes into detail on how to execute the inside and outside cradle, as well as the situations in which a cradle presents itself.

    Phase 2: Mid-Season (Disc 3)

    From mid-December through the end of January, Costanzo shows how to focus on more chain wrestling through key drills, individual coaching, and shorter live wrestling sessions. With most of the team's core technique established at this time, the main focus of the practice is hard situational drilling to enhance technique that was developed during the first phase and live wrestling to help prepare the wrestlers for competition. Costanzo shows how to reinforce solid positions through key drills such as Position Matches, the Maintain Position Drill, and actively sparring through awkward positions.

    Phase 3: Late-Season

    From the beginning of February through the end of the season, Coach Costanzo shows how cutting practice times shorter and becoming more efficient with overall time on the mat can help your wrestlers peak at tournament time. With more intense practices that focus on constant drilling and short, situational wrestling sessions, Coach Costanzo reveals how you can get your whole team, both starters and non-starters, to peak at the end of the season. During this session, the coaching staff shows how to run a short, highly-intense practice with drills that promote fast reaction time and explosiveness, but allow wrestlers to drill at a high pace on individualized technique.

    Learn how to master the practice room, develop your wrestlers throughout the season, and get your team prepared to wrestle their best when it counts - at the end of the year! Use this video to create the ideal three phase training system for your team, so they can peak when it matters the most!

    387 minutes (4 DVDs). 2017.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Jon Reader,
    University of Wisconsin Assistant Coach;
    former South Dakota State Assistant Coach;
    2x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    2011 NCAA National Champion and 3x All-American at Iowa State University.

    Whether on purpose or accident, wrestlers will find themselves in an underhook position at some point. They need to know how to finish once they have the underhook.

    Jon Reader has been successful at all levels of wrestling. One of the reasons for his success has been due to his ability to use an underhook to open up scoring situations. In this video, Reader shows how he gets to the underhook from distance and from various ties.

    The key to scoring on your feet is to create angles and control your opponent. Reader demonstrates techniques to secure an underhook and open the door for offensive attacks, such as a head inside single and high crotch. He provides insight from the collegiate and international wrestling scene on how the ability to get to your underhook can make the difference in winning or losing the match.

    Additionally, Reader demonstrates the fundamentals needed to secure and open opportunities to score from the front headlock. He shows why this position is a major way to score on the international stage of wrestling.

    Getting to the Underhook

    Learn how a good stance and positioning is the gateway to getting into your underhooks. Reader teaches the hand and footwork in order to dig the underhook. He stresses the details on how the hand and footwork must be together in order to gain the advantage. Reader demonstrates three simple and effective ways to get into your underhooks:

    • Head Club - A good initial setup for a underhook that will allow an opening to dig an underhook.
    • Wrist Roll - Great way to get into a underhook off of your opponent's collar tie.
    • Inside Elbow Post - A great way to create an opening if you are unable to set your underhook up with a wrist roll.

    Once the underhook is in, Reader demonstrates ways to move your opponent. This is vital as it helps create angles for the best scoring opportunities.

    Head Inside Single from Underhook

    Learn how to create an angle and attack with a head inside single (Knee Pull). Reader discusses hand and head position when attacking the leg that keeps you in correct position in order to finish the shot. You'll learn how to get to this position regardless of your opponent's position. You will also be taught how to beat your opponent's defenses once on the shot.

    Reader demonstrates how to finish from the inside single with two primary options based on the opponent's reaction.

    • Shelf and Circle - Primary finish on the mat to circle behind and secure a takedown.
    • Knee Slide to the Feet - Secondary finish on the mat if your opponent is defending with a whizzer and will allow you to take the single leg to your feet.

    High Crotch from the Underhook

    You'll be taught multiple techniques to move your opponent in order to get to your underhook and in position to hit a high crotch. Reader teaches a lesser known technique he calls the "meat hook" in order to set up your opponent. He also does an excellent job of showing how to properly hit and finish the high crotch from head, foot, hand and chest position.

    Getting to a Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a dominant tie that many wrestlers have difficulty defending. This will make your offense more effective. Learn the proper positioning to get into and use the front headlock. Reader covers three simple ways to get into a front headlock (including how not to get your arm trapped) from your feet:

    • Meat hook - His favorite set-up to create space in order to secure a front headlock.
    • Outside head pull - Great if you cannot create space off the meat hook.
    • Push-Pull - Allows you to use an opponent's momentum when their head is underneath your chest.

    He also goes over front headlock safety, shows two ways to counter common defense used by opponents, and the most effective way to finish a front headlock with a go behind.

    Scoring with a Front Headlock

    Reader demonstrates how to score with a front headlock based on realistic reactions that a wrestler might experience during a match.

    • Shoulder Shimmy - Allows you free your elbow to score if your opponent is clamping down on your arm.
    • Elbow Push - Used to score if your opponent reaches out and tries to block you from going behind them with their arm.
    • Head Pull - An effective way to get your opponent's elbow to the mat and open your go behind to score.
    • Big Step - Creates an angle to score on your opponent when they defend in a tripod and a head pull isn't working.
    • Far Knee Tap - Great way to score when an opponent gains elbow control and is focused on clearing the front headlock.

    Reader also covers how to clear a front head lock and several drills to help develop mastery from the front headlock, such as a push-pull drill, angle positioning drill, and a snap-hustle drill.

    If you want to learn how to be able to get in the underhook position in order to attack or control your opponent, then this is the video for you!

    70 minutes. 2017.


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    with Herb Stinson,
    former Aztec (NM) High School Head Coach;
    member of the National High School Athletic Coaches Association (NHSACA) Hall of Fame (2016);
    Wrestling USA Magazine National Coach of the Year (1991);
    3x NWCA National High School Coach of the Year ('91, '95, '00);
    12x NM High School State Champions, including 11 in a row (1990-2000);
    6x New Mexico A/3A State Coach of the Year;
    coach 65 individual State Champions and won 139 tournament championships; over 500 career wins

    National Hall of Fame Coach Herb Stinson has produced 65 individual state champions and coached 12 state championship teams during his coaching career. One of the reasons he's had great success is his ability to build a program from the ground up. Stinson understands that in order to mold a successful program, you need to develop wrestlers at all levels.

    Coach Stinson opens up his practice room and shows what his team works on to become a dominant wrestling program. He maximizes the amount of drilling covered in a practice by incorporating techniques into warm-ups. Coach Stinson has his wrestlers demonstrate the drills that have helped elevate Aztec High School wrestling, such as the takedown system and breakdown system.

    Takedown System

    Coach Stinson has his wrestlers demonstrates the basics of inside singles, outside singles, and Russians.

  • Inside Singles: Used to score when an opponent is stationary or backing up.
  • Outside Singles: A great way to score when an opponent pressures into you.
  • Russian to a Heel Pick: Catch an opponent's far ankle when they step their inside leg back.
  • Russian to Fireman's Carry: Used when an opponent has their weight on their heels.
  • Russian to a Stretch: A simple and effective takedown when an opponent is on their toes.
  • Coach Stinson also demonstrates several valuable drills that can increase a wrestler's takedown percentage, such as half body attacks, rope drills, and choreograph shots.

    Breakdown System

    Stopping your opponent's first move off the bottom and then learning to do a safe turn is important in building a program with young wrestlers. Stinson-coached teams are known for their tilts from top. This has led opponents to focus solely on keeping their wrist away while on bottom. Stinson has developed five key breakdowns to break any opponent flat and secure the wrist.

    • Pinch: A great first move to stop an opponent and trap their ankle.
    • Knee Swipe: Allows you to capture the far knee and put an opponent on their hip.
    • Arm Chop: Gives you the opportunity to trap the arm off the whistle and immediately go into a tilt.
    • Knee Jam: Allows for a wrestler to use their knee to drive an opponent flat.
    • Spiral: A great breakdown to put an opponent on their butt.

    Note: This section is a great complement to Coach Stinson's Tiger Tilt video (item#: WRD-05146).

    Practice Session

    See firsthand what an Aztec High School practice looks like, when Coach Stinson takes his team through a typical end-of-season practice from start to finish. You will have the opportunity to see the warm-up, live wrestling, and cool down.

    The warm-up is one of the most important aspects of the practice, because it's a time when the athletes will not only fine tune their technique, but also work on developing their strength, flexibility and overall conditioning. You'll understand the importance of drilling and how gaining more repetitions in all positions will allow for a wrestler to get better. A unique feature of Aztec practices is that a variety of conditioning drills are implemented during the practice session rather than after.

    The live wrestling consists of short situational scrambles with a partner, small group takedowns with King of the Mat, and technique-specific live wrestling out of the claw ride. Coach Stinson reinforces proper technique while encouraging his wrestlers to maintain a fast practice pace. This section of the video will allow you to better understand how to structure live wrestling for a practice.

    Strength & Conditioning - Peaking For State

    Wrestling consists of technique, strength and conditioning. Coach Stinson shows you how to get the conditioning needed and peak in time for the state tournament. See how he conditions his team in the last six weeks building up to the state tournament. This is a three day per week workout to get properly conditioned.

    • Morning Circuit Lift - Learn the 17 different lifts that the team does two mornings a week prior to school. Wrestlers need to have good explosive power. Stinson has designed a series of lifts that are 20 seconds on with a 10 second rest in order to get to the next station. Learn what order he puts the lifts in to maximize the conditioning of his wrestlers. Wrestlers will hit a fatigue level during this workout. This helps wrestlers learn to work through this fatigue to reach the maximum conditioning level and body coordination.
    • Running Work -Stinson teaches you how he alters workouts during the weeks leading up to the state tournament to include basic running, interval running, stair running and explosive running in order to peak at the right time before state.
    • Plyometric Box Workouts -Coach Stinson shows you how he uses plyo boxes to build explosive power and quickness. He shows a variety of hurdles, single touches, double touches and launches.

    Get insights to develop a system of wrestling perfected by the great Coach Stinson with this in-depth 'Open Practice' video!

    80 minutes. 2017.


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    with Matt Meuleners,
    Brown University Assistant Coach;
    former University of Nebraska Assistant Coach;
    Back-to-Back NCAA D-II National Champion and 4x All-American at Northern State University

    and Lindsey Remmers,
    Director of Performance Nutrition at the University of Nebraska; works specifically with the University of Nebraska wrestling team

    Matt Meuleners shows you the tricks and techniques he used to win two NCAA D-II titles. He demonstrates multiple attacks - focusing heavily on the high crotch and single leg - from multiple tie-ups and positions. Although the technique is designed for heavyweights, it is applicable to athletes of all sizes. His skill set is universal and he's masterful at teaching the little details that make it so effective for everyone.

    Lindsey Remmers has been working specifically with the Nebraska wrestling team. Therefore, she understands the constant need of wrestlers to maintain their weight and the rigors and demands of the sport. She presents a deeper understanding of the importance of correct eating habits and strategies to ensure your wrestlers are able to always make weight in a safe and effective manner - without draining them and optimizing their peak performance.

    On the Mat: Shot setups from ties, defense and short-offense

    Coach Meuleners learned to use his size and skill to defeat some of the toughest wrestlers in the nation. He breaks down his best techniques for positions that heavyweights notoriously use to slow matches down.

    Collar Ties

    Learn how to get an inside tie when your opponent collar ties you, and how to adjust your stance so your posture doesn't get broken down. From the inside tie, you will learn a couple of offensive options depending on the reactions of your opponent.

    From offensive collar ties, you will see how to get to a single leg when your opponent tries to get an inside tie, and how to get to a high crotch after switching to another collar tie with your opposite hand.

    Modified 2-on-1

    The modified 2-on-1 resembles a reverse arm drag in regard to hand position. This tie is great because as you circle into it, you have an excellent chance of getting deep into a high crotch, which is low risk and requires minimal effort; or, if your opponent squares up as you are circling in, he presents you with the opportunity to get a snatch single.

    Underhooks

    The number one move for a heavyweight from an underhook should be the snatch single on the same side. Meuleners goes into detail on how to get to the snatch single and finish it. If your opponent has head position, he shows how to easily snap the opponent down and get to a front head lock.

    As a smaller heavyweight, Meuleners became well-versed on how to clear underhooks and turn them to his advantage. He demonstrates three easy and simple ways to clear and get out of the underhook.

    Leg Attack Defense and Counter Offense

    Meuleners will explain why the common reaction of pulling your leg back while trying to defend either of them is incorrect. After successfully defending the leg attack, Meuleners combines this with a section on short offense. He demonstrates ways to score when:

    • Your opponent starts standing.
    • Your opponent grabs the elbow you are using to hold the front head lock.
    • Your opponent starts quad podding.

    Lecture: Nutrition for Wrestling

    Lindsey Remmers dispels outdated, dangerous methods of weight-cutting and sheds new light on how to make weight in a safe manner that optimizes performance and eliminates the feeling of hunger, which plagues most wrestlers when it comes time to make weight.

    Remmers illustrates the importance of eating proper meals throughout the day, and how this optimizes an athlete's muscle mass, reduces the level of body fat, and prevents the temptation to binge eat. Explanations are given on how consistently eating right can help wrestlers lose weight, and dispels the misconception that eating frequently hinders weight loss, when it actually speeds up metabolism. She provides examples of what could be consumed during the day at breakfast, pre-workout meals, and post-workout meals.

    Recovery

    It's common for wrestlers to skip eating something immediately after practice, for fear of gaining weight. Scientific studies are used to show that consuming carbohydrates and proteins during the early phases of recovery will positively affect exercise performance. Remmers also dispels the common misunderstanding that you must consume the largest portion of protein after working out, stressing that for optimal muscle building, protein should be consumed throughout the day.

    Weight Loss and Weight Gain

    Since dehydration plays such a big part in weight-cutting and wrestling culture in general, Remmers provides recommendations on what percentage wrestlers should stay above their weight division hydrated to make for an easy cut. If they follow the recommendations carefully, then when it comes time to cut weight, they will have roughly 1 to 2 pounds to lose.

    Graphs are displayed to give an example of the eating and hydration pattern a wrestler should follow when they are either trying to gain weight and move up a weight class, or lose weight. Additionally, several tips that adhere to safe practices for in-season weight-making are provided to help wrestlers lose any extra weight they might be concerned about. This will teach wrestlers how to eat correctly, maintain a feeling of satiety throughout the day, and perform optimally come competition time.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    124 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


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    WRD-05313A:

    with Bill Zadick,
    US National Freestyle Head Coach;
    2018 UWW World Cup Champions (Freestyle);
    2017 World Team Champions (Men's Freestyle);
    2006 Freestyle World Champion, 1996 NCAA Division I National Champion (University of Iowa)

    and Jon Pfeifer,
    University of Nebraska Wrestling Strength Coach; NSCA-Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

    Ever wonder what the difference is between the American freestyle and what's happening on the international scene? In this video, USA Men's National Freestyle Coach Bill Zadick breaks down the major trends in international wrestling that allowed the Men's National Freestyle team to capture their first team World Championship since 1995.

    Additionally, Jon Pfeifer breaks down the approach he has used at the University of Nebraska to produce of one of the toughest, best-conditioned teams in the NCAA. He walks you through their approach for each phase of the year and how he works with different weight classes and builds specific lifting programs for them during the season to help build or maintain strength.

    On the Mat: Trends in International Wrestling

    For many wrestlers and coaches in America, NCAA wrestlers are the most studied and imitated. Relatively little attention is paid to the techniques and trends in the broader world of freestyle wrestling, where the best wrestlers in the world compete.

    Bill Zadick has been through it all, from winning a National Title to winning a World Championship. He has coached the best in the world and now brings his insight to you. Coach Zadick has broken down international freestyle wrestling to see what other countries are doing to gain the advantage.

    Head Positioning

    Too often, coaches focus simply on maintaining a good stance, when in fact the most important thing to do is to control the head position battle. Using the example of Iranian wrestlers, Zadick breaks down an approach that will allow wrestlers to keep opponents off their legs while creating their own angles. He also shows a variety of drills and hand fighting methods that will create angles that allow for leg attacks against the fastest and most disciplined opponents.

    Underhook Defense

    The underhook is the most advantageous control tie in the current world of freestyle wrestling, as it allows the underhooking wrestler to push forward, scoring push outs and controlling the center of the mat for shot clock purposes. Zadick breaks down the drills being used by national team wrestlers to prevent leg attacks and clear the tie quickly. He puts special emphasis on the current methodology being used by the national team to prevent push outs.

    Par Terre Defense

    Par Terre is an area of freestyle wrestling where Americans have traditionally struggled - it's completely different from the mat wrestling found in folkstyle. Zadick breaks down the finer details of hip movement and scooting that are necessary to prevent an experienced and skilled opponent from completing a gut wrench turn.

    Coach Zadick breaks down the trends in the modern freestyle world, with many ideas into how one can incorporate this into developing your program and athletes for both the short and long term. He also provides many cutting edge insights into the techniques, approaches and styles of the current national team members, and many other international competitors.

    Lecture: Year-Round Strength Training for Wrestling

    Strength and conditioning plays a key role in the performance of any wrestler, whether it's the strength to finish a takedown or complete a stand-up, the quickness and explosiveness needed for a high-level shot, or the endurance required to fight through the third period and overtimes.

    Managing Different Phases in a Yearly Cycle

    Too often, coaches and wrestlers make the mistake of trying to tackle everything at once: strength, size, explosiveness, conditioning and wrestling skill. University of Nebraska Wrestling's Strength Coach, Jon Pfeifer, explains that this is impossible, and that these skills need to be emphasized during different parts of the year. Breaking the year down into four seasons - pre-season, in-season, post-season, and off-season - he explains how to tackle weight training and conditioning during each phase, and how to balance time on the wrestling mat and in the weight room during each season.

    Wrestling Specific Training

    Frequently, strength programs are adopted from templates designed for football or power lifting. They don't account for the unique demands of wrestling, specifically the overwhelming importance of training grip and neck strength. Pfeifer explains how they approach training these muscles, which frequently require a different approach than lifts like squats or deadlifts. He delves further into how they have programmed other wrestling-specific workouts, like banded resistance shots, weighted stance and motion drills, and footwork drills.

    Coach Pfeifer details a specific approach to training wrestlers year-round (in fact, over multiple years), to get the most out of time spent in the weight room. Additionally, he gives you the tools to make your own decisions and adjustments in order to fulfill your program's needs.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    163 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.



    WRD-05313B:

    with Matt Meuleners,
    Brown University Assistant Coach;
    former University of Nebraska Assistant Coach;
    Back-to-Back NCAA D-II National Champion and 4x All-American at Northern State University

    and Lindsey Remmers,
    Director of Performance Nutrition at the University of Nebraska; works specifically with the University of Nebraska wrestling team

    Matt Meuleners shows you the tricks and techniques he used to win two NCAA D-II titles. He demonstrates multiple attacks - focusing heavily on the high crotch and single leg - from multiple tie-ups and positions. Although the technique is designed for heavyweights, it is applicable to athletes of all sizes. His skill set is universal and he's masterful at teaching the little details that make it so effective for everyone.

    Lindsey Remmers has been working specifically with the Nebraska wrestling team. Therefore, she understands the constant need of wrestlers to maintain their weight and the rigors and demands of the sport. She presents a deeper understanding of the importance of correct eating habits and strategies to ensure your wrestlers are able to always make weight in a safe and effective manner - without draining them and optimizing their peak performance.

    On the Mat: Shot setups from ties, defense and short-offense

    Coach Meuleners learned to use his size and skill to defeat some of the toughest wrestlers in the nation. He breaks down his best techniques for positions that heavyweights notoriously use to slow matches down.

    Collar Ties

    Learn how to get an inside tie when your opponent collar ties you, and how to adjust your stance so your posture doesn't get broken down. From the inside tie, you will learn a couple of offensive options depending on the reactions of your opponent.

    From offensive collar ties, you will see how to get to a single leg when your opponent tries to get an inside tie, and how to get to a high crotch after switching to another collar tie with your opposite hand.

    Modified 2-on-1

    The modified 2-on-1 resembles a reverse arm drag in regard to hand position. This tie is great because as you circle into it, you have an excellent chance of getting deep into a high crotch, which is low risk and requires minimal effort; or, if your opponent squares up as you are circling in, he presents you with the opportunity to get a snatch single.

    Underhooks

    The number one move for a heavyweight from an underhook should be the snatch single on the same side. Meuleners goes into detail on how to get to the snatch single and finish it. If your opponent has head position, he shows how to easily snap the opponent down and get to a front head lock.

    As a smaller heavyweight, Meuleners became well-versed on how to clear underhooks and turn them to his advantage. He demonstrates three easy and simple ways to clear and get out of the underhook.

    Leg Attack Defense and Counter Offense

    Meuleners will explain why the common reaction of pulling your leg back while trying to defend either of them is incorrect. After successfully defending the leg attack, Meuleners combines this with a section on short offense. He demonstrates ways to score when:

    • Your opponent starts standing.
    • Your opponent grabs the elbow you are using to hold the front head lock.
    • Your opponent starts quad podding.

    Lecture: Nutrition for Wrestling

    Lindsey Remmers dispels outdated, dangerous methods of weight-cutting and sheds new light on how to make weight in a safe manner that optimizes performance and eliminates the feeling of hunger, which plagues most wrestlers when it comes time to make weight.

    Remmers illustrates the importance of eating proper meals throughout the day, and how this optimizes an athlete's muscle mass, reduces the level of body fat, and prevents the temptation to binge eat. Explanations are given on how consistently eating right can help wrestlers lose weight, and dispels the misconception that eating frequently hinders weight loss, when it actually speeds up metabolism. She provides examples of what could be consumed during the day at breakfast, pre-workout meals, and post-workout meals.

    Recovery

    It's common for wrestlers to skip eating something immediately after practice, for fear of gaining weight. Scientific studies are used to show that consuming carbohydrates and proteins during the early phases of recovery will positively affect exercise performance. Remmers also dispels the common misunderstanding that you must consume the largest portion of protein after working out, stressing that for optimal muscle building, protein should be consumed throughout the day.

    Weight Loss and Weight Gain

    Since dehydration plays such a big part in weight-cutting and wrestling culture in general, Remmers provides recommendations on what percentage wrestlers should stay above their weight division hydrated to make for an easy cut. If they follow the recommendations carefully, then when it comes time to cut weight, they will have roughly 1 to 2 pounds to lose.

    Graphs are displayed to give an example of the eating and hydration pattern a wrestler should follow when they are either trying to gain weight and move up a weight class, or lose weight. Additionally, several tips that adhere to safe practices for in-season weight-making are provided to help wrestlers lose any extra weight they might be concerned about. This will teach wrestlers how to eat correctly, maintain a feeling of satiety throughout the day, and perform optimally come competition time.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    124 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.




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    with Bill Zadick,
    US National Freestyle Head Coach;
    2018 UWW World Cup Champions (Freestyle);
    2017 World Team Champions (Men's Freestyle);
    2006 Freestyle World Champion, 1996 NCAA Division I National Champion (University of Iowa)

    and Jon Pfeifer,
    University of Nebraska Wrestling Strength Coach; NSCA-Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

    Ever wonder what the difference is between the American freestyle and what's happening on the international scene? In this video, USA Men's National Freestyle Coach Bill Zadick breaks down the major trends in international wrestling that allowed the Men's National Freestyle team to capture their first team World Championship since 1995.

    Additionally, Jon Pfeifer breaks down the approach he has used at the University of Nebraska to produce of one of the toughest, best-conditioned teams in the NCAA. He walks you through their approach for each phase of the year and how he works with different weight classes and builds specific lifting programs for them during the season to help build or maintain strength.

    On the Mat: Trends in International Wrestling

    For many wrestlers and coaches in America, NCAA wrestlers are the most studied and imitated. Relatively little attention is paid to the techniques and trends in the broader world of freestyle wrestling, where the best wrestlers in the world compete.

    Bill Zadick has been through it all, from winning a National Title to winning a World Championship. He has coached the best in the world and now brings his insight to you. Coach Zadick has broken down international freestyle wrestling to see what other countries are doing to gain the advantage.

    Head Positioning

    Too often, coaches focus simply on maintaining a good stance, when in fact the most important thing to do is to control the head position battle. Using the example of Iranian wrestlers, Zadick breaks down an approach that will allow wrestlers to keep opponents off their legs while creating their own angles. He also shows a variety of drills and hand fighting methods that will create angles that allow for leg attacks against the fastest and most disciplined opponents.

    Underhook Defense

    The underhook is the most advantageous control tie in the current world of freestyle wrestling, as it allows the underhooking wrestler to push forward, scoring push outs and controlling the center of the mat for shot clock purposes. Zadick breaks down the drills being used by national team wrestlers to prevent leg attacks and clear the tie quickly. He puts special emphasis on the current methodology being used by the national team to prevent push outs.

    Par Terre Defense

    Par Terre is an area of freestyle wrestling where Americans have traditionally struggled - it's completely different from the mat wrestling found in folkstyle. Zadick breaks down the finer details of hip movement and scooting that are necessary to prevent an experienced and skilled opponent from completing a gut wrench turn.

    Coach Zadick breaks down the trends in the modern freestyle world, with many ideas into how one can incorporate this into developing your program and athletes for both the short and long term. He also provides many cutting edge insights into the techniques, approaches and styles of the current national team members, and many other international competitors.

    Lecture: Year-Round Strength Training for Wrestling

    Strength and conditioning plays a key role in the performance of any wrestler, whether it's the strength to finish a takedown or complete a stand-up, the quickness and explosiveness needed for a high-level shot, or the endurance required to fight through the third period and overtimes.

    Managing Different Phases in a Yearly Cycle

    Too often, coaches and wrestlers make the mistake of trying to tackle everything at once: strength, size, explosiveness, conditioning and wrestling skill. University of Nebraska Wrestling's Strength Coach, Jon Pfeifer, explains that this is impossible, and that these skills need to be emphasized during different parts of the year. Breaking the year down into four seasons - pre-season, in-season, post-season, and off-season - he explains how to tackle weight training and conditioning during each phase, and how to balance time on the wrestling mat and in the weight room during each season.

    Wrestling Specific Training

    Frequently, strength programs are adopted from templates designed for football or power lifting. They don't account for the unique demands of wrestling, specifically the overwhelming importance of training grip and neck strength. Pfeifer explains how they approach training these muscles, which frequently require a different approach than lifts like squats or deadlifts. He delves further into how they have programmed other wrestling-specific workouts, like banded resistance shots, weighted stance and motion drills, and footwork drills.

    Coach Pfeifer details a specific approach to training wrestlers year-round (in fact, over multiple years), to get the most out of time spent in the weight room. Additionally, he gives you the tools to make your own decisions and adjustments in order to fulfill your program's needs.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    163 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


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    with Kevin Dresser,
    Iowa State University Head Coach;
    former Virginia Tech Head Coach; 2017 ACC Co-Coach of the Year;
    2016 NWCA Coach of the Year;
    three straight ACC Dual Meet Champions (2015-17); Back-to-Back ACC Tournament Champions (2013-14);
    former Christiansburg (VA) High School Head Coach,
    5x Virginia Group AA State Champions;
    1986 NCAA Champion and 2x All-American wrestler at the University of Iowa

    Are you wondering what you can do to improve practice? Do you want to know if you're doing the right things? Many coaches spend time wondering if what they're doing is the right thing for their team.

    Kevin Dresser has experienced great success in high school and college as a coach. In this video, he describes some of the biggest mistakes he has made as a coach. He also passes on what he's learned from those mistakes to allow you an opportunity to avoid making the same mistakes.

    Coach Dresser's Keys to Success

    The first part of the video outlines what Dresser calls his practice 'anatomy.' He has eight general steps that he uses everyday leading into his competition weekend. These begin with warm-ups (when to warm up hard and when to warm up subdued) and complete with live wrestling. He bookends these steps with a pre-practice talk and closes with an exit message. These are both important to the athlete as you bring them into a practice, as well as when you send them forward from practice.

    'The 5 Biggest Mistakes a Coach Can Make'

    Coach Dresser follows up practice plans with his five biggest mistakes that you can make as a coach. These come from many years being on one side of the whistle. The biggest one is not showing every move you know. Your athletes will learn the flashy/fun stuff on their own, but to win, they have to be good at the basics.

    Dresser is also a huge proponent of the team concept, even as far as how he utilizes his staff and communication with those over him in the food chain. He concludes with an insightful, experience-laden perspective on warning signals of over-training (especially high school athletes).

    'The 5 Most Important Things to Build a Championship Program'

    Coach Dresser completes his session by sharing program-building philosophies. Thoughts on building from the ground up in your school, becoming someone who is respected and embodies the values you will want in your athletes such as hard work. The 'grassroots' style of program building will eventually get people into the seats and have your community, parents and administrators supporting you. He emphasizes the team concept once again, but places more importance on self-development and out-working everyone else you compete against.

    Success isn't just measured in wins and losses; it has to be also measured in the incremental steps necessary to get to the top and then sustain it. Whether you are a rookie coach, or have been coaching for numerous years, this video contains information that anyone can use to grow!

    35 minutes. 2018.


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    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    Mat wrestling is a forgotten art. Most kids want to work on takedowns, but wrestling consists of three areas in total that need to be worked on.

    In this video, four-time All-American Troy Nickerson shows you how to incorporate a series of drills that will improve wrestlers in the top and bottom positions at the same time. He starts with some foundational drills that are later integrated into other drills.

    Coach Nickerson teaches you drills that you can put your own moves into and have success. Bottom wrestlers will learn how to maintain a solid base and how to get their hips away for an escape or reversal. Top wrestlers will learn to maintain forward pressure and hip control. These drills will build good instincts and will give wrestlers the confidence to hit their moves in competition.

    Bottom Position Wrestling Drills

    Nickerson builds wrestlers by getting them to embrace the basics. He starts with a drill that helps the bottom wrestler learn to maintain a good base position while creating space on bottom with a knee slide or changeover. It's important that a wrestler has great hips, which helps them to move on bottom. He covers three different drills to help improve hip heist for all wrestlers. He then uses several drills that cover stand ups, sit-outs, and Granby rolls.

    All the moves are combined, and the scenarios are endless. There are also drills for clearing legs, working reversals, and re-attacking from a stand up. This series isn't just focused on technique, it also incorporates whistle start drills and drills from bottom with mat returns. These drills can advance athletes to a high level in a short amount of time.

    Top Position Wrestling Drills

    The second half of this video starts with teaching the top wrestler how to break down an opponent's solid base by keeping active forward pressure. Drills are added that emphasize riding under the arms and hip control while staying off the knees. Key concepts cover countering all offensive scoring attempts from the bottom wrestler.

    Coach Nickerson's drills also touch on maintaining control when the bottom man rolls, sits out, or stands up.

    You'll get a drill that Nickerson uses with his wrestlers to improve returning wrestlers to the mat. It covers how to land and how to use multiple returns. There are also drills for using tilts and pinning combinations. These drills are then combined to encourage chain wrestling on the mat.

    Coach Nickerson does a great job of setting athletes up for success. This is a fantastic video for athletes and coaches that want to improve rapidly!

    54 minutes. 2018.


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    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    Does your team need to be better on their feet? If you need more takedowns, this video has what you need! You will learn a drill series to get your wrestlers better on their feet from four-time All-American Troy Nickerson, who teaches ways to score from shots as well as defensive scoring to make your wrestlers complete threats on the mat.

    Coach Nickerson brings his coaching techniques into your room, beginning with the basics of stance and motion and progressively moving to his finishing drills. Learn how and when to use each of these drills to improve wrestler performance. Nickerson has designed these progressions to grow athletes from a very raw and basic level, to the highest level of competitors.

    Footwork Drills: Speed, Balance, and Flexibility

    Any wrestler that is great on their feet uses stance and motion to improve their skills. Coach Nickerson demonstrates drills to get hands and feet moving together to improve attack and defense speeds. These drills cover:

    • Stance and Motion - Learn how to move hands and feet together, plus how to develop solid level changes, down blocks, cross blocks, head blocks and knee drops.
    • Foot Speed - Develop the speed needed to get to the leg and defend. Master the over and back, side to side, and leg switches.

      Flexibility and Balance - Increase hip and leg flexibility by mastering single leg finish stretches and back step drills.

    Learn How To Drill Control Ties

    Nickerson covers a few different drills on positioning that allow wrestlers to have a higher success rate on their shots. He demonstrates drills for gaining and getting out of underhooks, collar ties, and 2-on-1 ties. Using the climbing drill, wrestlers will learn how to work up to a proper tie without providing a chance for their opponent to score.

    This video allows you to build wrestlers from beginners to beast with simple drills that everyone can do. If you want to get better on your feet, Coach Nickerson can help get you there!

    57 minutes. 2018.


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    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    One of the easiest ways to control the bottom man is to be good at using the legs. Leg riders can control a match and score a lot of points before the bottom man has realized what's happened. This video is great for teaching leg riding.

    Troy Nickerson demonstrates over 15 drills and moves that show how to get into legs and how to crush opponents from the top position. What makes his legs rides so tough to defend is that they transfer from legs to other turns and rides with ease.

    Getting the Leg In

    Most wrestlers only have one way to get legs in, which makes them predictable. Nickerson covers two standard breakdowns that he uses to make the transition to legs simple. He begins with a tight waist chop that sets up legs with a tilt. When he comes out of the tilt, the leg easily goes in.

    His next setup is a spiral ride that gets the bottom wrestler extended and allows the leg to easily flow inside. These two rides help wrestlers get to the legs, regardless of their positioning, and help eliminate the riskiness of riding legs.

    Turns and Pins

    Coach Nickerson covers six turns that are based around his breakdowns. These range from a simple face-lift to a power half, to a tilt series, and cross-body ride series. The great part about several of his turns is that they easily transfer to an arm bar series or a ball and chain series of turns and back to the legs. Because of this flexibility in the top position, the top wrestler can become almost unstoppable and can make it hard for the bottom man to figure out any way to escape.

    This video from Coach Nickerson will allow an average rider to become a devastating force and make others want to avoid going underneath at all costs!

    47 minutes. 2018.


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    WRD-05335A:

    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    Does your team need to be better on their feet? If you need more takedowns, this video has what you need! You will learn a drill series to get your wrestlers better on their feet from four-time All-American Troy Nickerson, who teaches ways to score from shots as well as defensive scoring to make your wrestlers complete threats on the mat.

    Coach Nickerson brings his coaching techniques into your room, beginning with the basics of stance and motion and progressively moving to his finishing drills. Learn how and when to use each of these drills to improve wrestler performance. Nickerson has designed these progressions to grow athletes from a very raw and basic level, to the highest level of competitors.

    Footwork Drills: Speed, Balance, and Flexibility

    Any wrestler that is great on their feet uses stance and motion to improve their skills. Coach Nickerson demonstrates drills to get hands and feet moving together to improve attack and defense speeds. These drills cover:

    • Stance and Motion - Learn how to move hands and feet together, plus how to develop solid level changes, down blocks, cross blocks, head blocks and knee drops.
    • Foot Speed - Develop the speed needed to get to the leg and defend. Master the over and back, side to side, and leg switches.

      Flexibility and Balance - Increase hip and leg flexibility by mastering single leg finish stretches and back step drills.

    Learn How To Drill Control Ties

    Nickerson covers a few different drills on positioning that allow wrestlers to have a higher success rate on their shots. He demonstrates drills for gaining and getting out of underhooks, collar ties, and 2-on-1 ties. Using the climbing drill, wrestlers will learn how to work up to a proper tie without providing a chance for their opponent to score.

    This video allows you to build wrestlers from beginners to beast with simple drills that everyone can do. If you want to get better on your feet, Coach Nickerson can help get you there!

    57 minutes. 2018.



    WRD-05335B:

    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    Mat wrestling is a forgotten art. Most kids want to work on takedowns, but wrestling consists of three areas in total that need to be worked on.

    In this video, four-time All-American Troy Nickerson shows you how to incorporate a series of drills that will improve wrestlers in the top and bottom positions at the same time. He starts with some foundational drills that are later integrated into other drills.

    Coach Nickerson teaches you drills that you can put your own moves into and have success. Bottom wrestlers will learn how to maintain a solid base and how to get their hips away for an escape or reversal. Top wrestlers will learn to maintain forward pressure and hip control. These drills will build good instincts and will give wrestlers the confidence to hit their moves in competition.

    Bottom Position Wrestling Drills

    Nickerson builds wrestlers by getting them to embrace the basics. He starts with a drill that helps the bottom wrestler learn to maintain a good base position while creating space on bottom with a knee slide or changeover. It's important that a wrestler has great hips, which helps them to move on bottom. He covers three different drills to help improve hip heist for all wrestlers. He then uses several drills that cover stand ups, sit-outs, and Granby rolls.

    All the moves are combined, and the scenarios are endless. There are also drills for clearing legs, working reversals, and re-attacking from a stand up. This series isn't just focused on technique, it also incorporates whistle start drills and drills from bottom with mat returns. These drills can advance athletes to a high level in a short amount of time.

    Top Position Wrestling Drills

    The second half of this video starts with teaching the top wrestler how to break down an opponent's solid base by keeping active forward pressure. Drills are added that emphasize riding under the arms and hip control while staying off the knees. Key concepts cover countering all offensive scoring attempts from the bottom wrestler.

    Coach Nickerson's drills also touch on maintaining control when the bottom man rolls, sits out, or stands up.

    You'll get a drill that Nickerson uses with his wrestlers to improve returning wrestlers to the mat. It covers how to land and how to use multiple returns. There are also drills for using tilts and pinning combinations. These drills are then combined to encourage chain wrestling on the mat.

    Coach Nickerson does a great job of setting athletes up for success. This is a fantastic video for athletes and coaches that want to improve rapidly!

    54 minutes. 2018.



    WRD-05335C:

    with Troy Nickerson,
    Northern Colorado University Head Coach;
    former Iowa State University Assistant Coach;
    NCAA D1 National Champion and 4x All-American at Cornell University;
    the first 5x state champion in New York

    One of the easiest ways to control the bottom man is to be good at using the legs. Leg riders can control a match and score a lot of points before the bottom man has realized what's happened. This video is great for teaching leg riding.

    Troy Nickerson demonstrates over 15 drills and moves that show how to get into legs and how to crush opponents from the top position. What makes his legs rides so tough to defend is that they transfer from legs to other turns and rides with ease.

    Getting the Leg In

    Most wrestlers only have one way to get legs in, which makes them predictable. Nickerson covers two standard breakdowns that he uses to make the transition to legs simple. He begins with a tight waist chop that sets up legs with a tilt. When he comes out of the tilt, the leg easily goes in.

    His next setup is a spiral ride that gets the bottom wrestler extended and allows the leg to easily flow inside. These two rides help wrestlers get to the legs, regardless of their positioning, and help eliminate the riskiness of riding legs.

    Turns and Pins

    Coach Nickerson covers six turns that are based around his breakdowns. These range from a simple face-lift to a power half, to a tilt series, and cross-body ride series. The great part about several of his turns is that they easily transfer to an arm bar series or a ball and chain series of turns and back to the legs. Because of this flexibility in the top position, the top wrestler can become almost unstoppable and can make it hard for the bottom man to figure out any way to escape.

    This video from Coach Nickerson will allow an average rider to become a devastating force and make others want to avoid going underneath at all costs!

    47 minutes. 2018.




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  • 09/23/18--22:00: Defending Leg Riders
  • with Mike Moreno,
    University of Northern Colorado Assistant Coach;
    2x All-American for Iowa State University

    Finding yourself trapped underneath a good leg rider can be one of the most intimidating places to be in a wrestling match if you don't understand the mechanics of leg riding.

    In this video, two-time All-American Mike Moreno shows how to beat leg riders in a multitude of situations. Moreno has built a system of leg riding defense based around "forcing the sit and clearing the pocket," maintaining superior position and reacting to the opponent's actions. His system emphasizes scoring out of your opponent's leg ride.

    Coach Moreno demonstrates fundamental techniques to defend and score against an opponent's leg ride, as well as common scenarios from the position, such as power halves, double boots and being flat on your belly. This video will show how to get reversals that will also lead to back points.

    Creating a Superior Defensive Position

    Moreno demonstrates "forcing the sit and clearing the pocket" and creating a superior position in which to attack the top rider and score backs and potential pin falls. He demonstrates how to create and maintain a position that will maximize offensive opportunities. You'll learn techniques including:

    • Forcing the sit: Establishes a superior defensive position from the bottom in which to attack the leg rider.
    • Clearing the Pockets and Creating Hip Separation: Ideal position to limit offensive opportunities for your opponent.
    • Attacking the Foot: Helps to pin the opponent's hips to the mat and allow for better movement from the bottom wrestler.
    • Vaulting the Hips: Creates and maintains constant pressure on the opponent.

    Beating Tough Leg Riding Situations

    A tough leg rider can be dominant at the high school and youth level. Coach Moreno covers some of the most common leg riding situations and provides you with a plan of attack to not only defend against these turns, but to create your own scoring opportunities, including:

    • Crossface: Moreno shows two options to reverse the opponent to their back when they try to crossface while in a good sit position. Includes when the opponent has you going toward the direction they want.
    • Being Pulled Back: Defend against being pulled back, without giving up back points, and reverse your opponent.
    • Power Half: Learn a low-risk swim technique that will get a quick reversal with a possible near fall.
    • Flat on the Mat: Discover how to transition back to the good sit position or free your leg when flat on the mat with one or two legs in. Once back in the good sit position, all the previous options become available again.

    Coach Moreno does an excellent job explaining the "whys" and "hows" of the technique and application in various scenarios. Having the knowledge to defend and beat leg riding is invaluable. The techniques and positions shown by Moreno will be a game-changer for the developing bottom wrestler.

    50 minutes. 2018.


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    with Tucker Lane,
    University of Northern Colorado Assistant Coach;
    4x NCAA Qualifier at heavyweight for the University of Nebraska;
    4x NWCA All-Academic team

    Mindset and strategy, regardless of stature, are just as important for victorious heavyweight wrestling. Tucker Lane was able to compete and win at heavyweight despite being at a size and strength disadvantage in many matches using the mindset and strategies taught in this video!

    Creating Scoring Opportunities with Aggressive Head Control

    Constantly moving and controlling the head forces a heavyweight to move, fatiguing them and presenting more opportunities to attack later in the match. Coach Lane demonstrates drills to develop the feel of how to effectively control the head. This pressure, applied constantly in the early rounds of a match, will lead to big dividends (scoring opportunities) in the latter stages of the match.

    Control Ties: Underhooks

    Once a wrestler has worn their opponent out with head pressure, it's time to focus on getting into a control tie so the athlete can attack their opponent. Lane focuses on three control ties:

    • Collar Tie
    • 2-on-1
    • Underhook

    He explains the objectives and reasons why he likes the collar tie and 2-on-1, but spends the majority of this segment showing attacks from the underhook.

    Heavyweight wrestlers have monstrous hips and thighs, making it easy for them to defend bad shots by simply sprawling back. Lane shows why attacks from the underhook are ideal, because they don't put wrestlers in a precarious position when attacking, and, offer a high reward as the finishes are easy to execute.

    The underhook is a dominant tie up, and no decent wrestler will just give it up, so Coach Lanes show you how to get into an underhook from two scenarios - when you have a collar tie and when an opponent over-extends. He also details the ideal head position from an underhook to maximize scoring opportunities.

    After getting the underhook, four solid attacks are covered. These attacks complement each other and build a varied and highly successful strategy for heavyweight competitions:

    • Snap down to a front headlock
    • Execute a throw-by
    • Hit a far knee pick
    • Get a snatch single

    Coach Lane goes into detail on how to execute and finish a snatch single, and why it should be a heavyweight's bread and butter move from this position on. After getting the snatch single, Tucker explains the more dynamic finishes from the single leg that don't work that well at heavyweight, and instead, shows how to elevate the leg to finish.

    Defensive Techniques on the Mat

    At heavyweight, a lot of easy points are given from the front head lock position. Coach Lane shows a simple method to get out of the front head lock by adhering to the principles of:

    • Tripoding up
    • Keeping arms close
    • Grabbing the hand that's controlling the neck
    • Getting the head across the chest
    • Continuing to circle until you get out

    When it comes to tactics on the mat, Tucker keeps it simple and shows why the best way for a heavyweight to get off their belly is to simply use their inside knee to get up into the referee's position, and pressure themselves to stand up from there. The technique is taught clearly, allowing even the most uncoordinated heavyweight to understand what they need to do. On top, you will learn how to counter this position to maintain top position and potentially rack up riding points.

    Coach Lane provides all the techniques, positions, and strategies needed to be successful competing and winning in the heavyweight division!

    66 minutes. 2018.


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    with Zac Dominguez,
    President and Head Coach of MWC Wrestling Academy in Omaha (NE);
    former University of Nebraska Omaha Assistant Coach;
    President of USA Wrestling Coaching Council;
    Freestyle and Greco Director for Nebraska USA Wrestling;
    2013 USA National Developmental Coach of the Year;
    2007 USA Wrestling Coach of the Year;

    and Dr. Grove Higgins,
    Human Performance and Rehabilitation Clinic Director (CO);

    Coach Dominguez covers how a coach can keep a practice structured and fun at the same time by using drill games. The games not only keep practice fun and exciting, but also develop skill. Games include:

    • Quad Hand Fight: Teaches wrestlers how to keep the pressure off their hands and put the opponent's weight on their hands.
    • Go to Back Drill: Teaches a wrestler how to back arch by falling backwards.
    • Foot Tag: Develops level change and quickness.
    • Double Reverse Lift: Emphasizes a wrestler getting their hips underneath them in order to lift their opponent off the mat before their opponent lifts them.
    • Hand Fighting on the Knees: Teaches wrestlers to fight for position and move their opponent just by using their upper body.

    Questions and Answers

    Coach Dominguez answers questions from other coaches who are in attendance. Topics covered include:

    • How to open lines of communication for wrestlers of all ages.
    • The biggest issues youth wrestlers face and how to overcome those issues.
    • How to control parents and have them fit your system as opposed to having your system fit them. This includes dealing with other sports they may be playing.
    • How to develop unorthodox techniques that kids may use that are not normally taught.
    • His year round program development.

    Lecture: Improving Mobility and Adaptation for Athletes through Repetition

    Dr. Higgins provides the insight for any coach or athlete to unlock their potential to increase overall performance. This will also directly translate into wrestling by allowing an athlete to learn technique quicker due to having a greater ability to move, decrease injury potential, and increase overall performance.

    Shin Box

    Dr. Higgins introduces the 'Shin Box system' that coaches and athletes can use to assess and train mobility. He also covers the prescription, progressions, and instruction of the mobility drills within the system. This system is a game-changer in the world of sports performance because it can drastically increase performance in an athlete.

    Questions and Answers

    Higgins opens the floor for a variety of questions and answers. Some of the most common questions relate to pain management in the lower back and the wrist, were he addresses three specific drills:

    • Squat and Twist: A simple and effective drill to eliminate back pain.
    • Arm Bar: Utilizes a kettlebell to release tension around the spine.
    • Wrist Rolls: Helps realign the bones in the wrist and hand in order to decrease pain.

    Dr. Higgins breaks down performance to the most basic level so that you will understand how to improve mobility and maximize the performance of your athletes.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    185 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


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    with Mike Duroe,
    Cornell College Head Coach; winningest coach in Cornell history

    and Mike Clayton,
    USA Wrestling National Coaches Education Program Manager;
    Former Head Coach at Stevens Institute of Technology;
    2008 NCAA Division III Rookie Coach of the Year

    and Joe Russell,
    US National Freestyle Assistant Coach;
    former George Mason University Head Coach and Assistant Coach at the University of Minnesota

    Mike Clayton and Mike Duroe take on common problem positions for youth and high school wrestlers. This is a wonderful training video where both coaches take insightful questions from the field and answer them on the spot.

    Joe Russell has an extensive background in wrestling and coaching. Along the way, he has put together a guide book that goes out to each of his athletes. This helps all parties to be on the same page and a true part of the program.

    On the Mat: Coaching Techniques

    Coaches Clayton and Duroe field questions regarding technique, but also cover finishing and countering a head inside single. Their focus is on when to let go of the leg as well as how to counter this shot.

    Clayton begins with basic understanding of when a good time is to hang onto the leg and let go of it. This sequence leads to discussion on the importance of having good mobility in order to finish and some complete finishes from a head inside.

    He also discusses the importance of connecting with your athletes and including them in the teaching aspect of coaching as well as sitting down with your assistants and getting their involvement or technique to assist the athletes. Clayton completes with some finishes and how to coach young kids.

    Coach Duroe discusses the importance of position and how to integrate it into a practice. He firmly believes in having high and low level guys in the room at the same time in order to grow everyone. He also discusses how getting up off the mat is of primary importance after hitting a shot. This leads into several ways to get to a single and how hand fighting makes that easier.

    From a more technical aspect, Duroe covers basic positioning for his short offense and how he continues to win those positions. Finally he fields a question about crossfacing; when, how, and the most important aspects of it. Coach Duroe has a good pedigree in coaching athletes at the highest levels of the sport.

    Lecture: The George Mason Way

    Coach Russell provides a description of materials that he provides to each of his athletes to ensure they are all on the same page and know what is expected. He also goes through some of his general team philosophy of technique

    The first part of his guidebook is a section on general expectations and priorities. This gives a rough outline to his philosophy, the team culture, and some principles of success. He talks about how important it is to take care of each other and how to "Maintain excellence in everything we do." He stresses time management and his code of conduct that holds athletes accountable.

    In the second section, Russell focuses on technique strategy. This includes the general items that are practiced during the season as well as all the "fun stuff" that will be gone over in the off-season. He outlines the difference between high percentage and low percentage technique and why it's important to differentiate between the two. Finally, he goes through his philosophies in each position on the mat.

    As a conclusion, Coach Russell writes about his off the mat strategies. This includes items such as life skills, "How do we win in other areas of life," and "Fake it until you make it." This is a great section because typically, if our lives outside of wrestling are squared away, the wrestling part is easier!

    157 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


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    WRD-05368A: with Mike Duroe,
    Cornell College Head Coach; winningest coach in Cornell history

    and Mike Clayton,
    USA Wrestling National Coaches Education Program Manager;
    Former Head Coach at Stevens Institute of Technology;
    2008 NCAA Division III Rookie Coach of the Year

    and Joe Russell,
    US National Freestyle Assistant Coach;
    former George Mason University Head Coach and Assistant Coach at the University of Minnesota

    Mike Clayton and Mike Duroe take on common problem positions for youth and high school wrestlers. This is a wonderful training video where both coaches take insightful questions from the field and answer them on the spot.

    Joe Russell has an extensive background in wrestling and coaching. Along the way, he has put together a guide book that goes out to each of his athletes. This helps all parties to be on the same page and a true part of the program.

    On the Mat: Coaching Techniques

    Coaches Clayton and Duroe field questions regarding technique, but also cover finishing and countering a head inside single. Their focus is on when to let go of the leg as well as how to counter this shot.

    Clayton begins with basic understanding of when a good time is to hang onto the leg and let go of it. This sequence leads to discussion on the importance of having good mobility in order to finish and some complete finishes from a head inside.

    He also discusses the importance of connecting with your athletes and including them in the teaching aspect of coaching as well as sitting down with your assistants and getting their involvement or technique to assist the athletes. Clayton completes with some finishes and how to coach young kids.

    Coach Duroe discusses the importance of position and how to integrate it into a practice. He firmly believes in having high and low level guys in the room at the same time in order to grow everyone. He also discusses how getting up off the mat is of primary importance after hitting a shot. This leads into several ways to get to a single and how hand fighting makes that easier.

    From a more technical aspect, Duroe covers basic positioning for his short offense and how he continues to win those positions. Finally he fields a question about crossfacing; when, how, and the most important aspects of it. Coach Duroe has a good pedigree in coaching athletes at the highest levels of the sport.

    Lecture: The George Mason Way

    Coach Russell provides a description of materials that he provides to each of his athletes to ensure they are all on the same page and know what is expected. He also goes through some of his general team philosophy of technique

    The first part of his guidebook is a section on general expectations and priorities. This gives a rough outline to his philosophy, the team culture, and some principles of success. He talks about how important it is to take care of each other and how to "Maintain excellence in everything we do." He stresses time management and his code of conduct that holds athletes accountable.

    In the second section, Russell focuses on technique strategy. This includes the general items that are practiced during the season as well as all the "fun stuff" that will be gone over in the off-season. He outlines the difference between high percentage and low percentage technique and why it's important to differentiate between the two. Finally, he goes through his philosophies in each position on the mat.

    As a conclusion, Coach Russell writes about his off the mat strategies. This includes items such as life skills, "How do we win in other areas of life," and "Fake it until you make it." This is a great section because typically, if our lives outside of wrestling are squared away, the wrestling part is easier!

    157 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.



    WRD-05368B:

    with Zac Dominguez,
    President and Head Coach of MWC Wrestling Academy in Omaha (NE);
    former University of Nebraska Omaha Assistant Coach;
    President of USA Wrestling Coaching Council;
    Freestyle and Greco Director for Nebraska USA Wrestling;
    2013 USA National Developmental Coach of the Year;
    2007 USA Wrestling Coach of the Year;

    and Dr. Grove Higgins,
    Human Performance and Rehabilitation Clinic Director (CO);

    Coach Dominguez covers how a coach can keep a practice structured and fun at the same time by using drill games. The games not only keep practice fun and exciting, but also develop skill. Games include:

    • Quad Hand Fight: Teaches wrestlers how to keep the pressure off their hands and put the opponent's weight on their hands.
    • Go to Back Drill: Teaches a wrestler how to back arch by falling backwards.
    • Foot Tag: Develops level change and quickness.
    • Double Reverse Lift: Emphasizes a wrestler getting their hips underneath them in order to lift their opponent off the mat before their opponent lifts them.
    • Hand Fighting on the Knees: Teaches wrestlers to fight for position and move their opponent just by using their upper body.

    Questions and Answers

    Coach Dominguez answers questions from other coaches who are in attendance. Topics covered include:

    • How to open lines of communication for wrestlers of all ages.
    • The biggest issues youth wrestlers face and how to overcome those issues.
    • How to control parents and have them fit your system as opposed to having your system fit them. This includes dealing with other sports they may be playing.
    • How to develop unorthodox techniques that kids may use that are not normally taught.
    • His year round program development.

    Lecture: Improving Mobility and Adaptation for Athletes through Repetition

    Dr. Higgins provides the insight for any coach or athlete to unlock their potential to increase overall performance. This will also directly translate into wrestling by allowing an athlete to learn technique quicker due to having a greater ability to move, decrease injury potential, and increase overall performance.

    Shin Box

    Dr. Higgins introduces the 'Shin Box system' that coaches and athletes can use to assess and train mobility. He also covers the prescription, progressions, and instruction of the mobility drills within the system. This system is a game-changer in the world of sports performance because it can drastically increase performance in an athlete.

    Questions and Answers

    Higgins opens the floor for a variety of questions and answers. Some of the most common questions relate to pain management in the lower back and the wrist, were he addresses three specific drills:

    • Squat and Twist: A simple and effective drill to eliminate back pain.
    • Arm Bar: Utilizes a kettlebell to release tension around the spine.
    • Wrist Rolls: Helps realign the bones in the wrist and hand in order to decrease pain.

    Dr. Higgins breaks down performance to the most basic level so that you will understand how to improve mobility and maximize the performance of your athletes.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    185 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.




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    YWVD-04220A: with Greg Strobel, Distinguished member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame (2012);
    former Lehigh University Head Coach; USA Wrestling's 2010 Man of the Year; '03-'04 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 4x EIWA Coach of the Year; 2000 US Olympic Team Coach; 2x NCAA Champions (and 3x All American) at Oregon State

    Get help developing a multitude of practice plans that will maximize your wrestler's performance on the mat.

    Hall of Fame Coach Greg Strobel is a leader in coaching education. In this video, Coach Strobel shares many insights from his illustrious career that will provide you with a foundation on which to plan your practices. His discussion covers a wide range of topics including practice length, intensity, and the three main aspects of wrestling.

    Identifying your core philosophy will help you to plan your practices (and your program) around what you believe is most important. Coach Strobel emphasizes how your core philosophy drives not only how you run a practice, but what you want your athletes to get out of it. He believes that having fun is extremely important and that you don't have to break an athlete in order to get a top performance from them.

    Coach Strobel is a master at making a practice plan and laying it out in easy to digest bite-sized pieces that can be combined in multiple variations for an unending supply of practices. He then talks about five areas to consider when developing practices: length of practice, intensity of practice, three principles of planning (technical skill, athletic skill, and fitness level), week at a glance, and peaking.

    Strobel then reveals several of his trademark workouts:

    • Pre-Combat Options - Five different combinations of Warm-up and Drilling.
    • Combat Options - 11 different combinations of types of live wrestling.
    • Post-Combat Options - Different choices of cool down exercises.
    Varying practices is very important to keep your wrestlers fresh and excited about attending practice. By mixing and matching these options, the user can develop hundreds of different practice plans based on the level of intensity and volume you require.

    This enables you to see the principles of practice planning applied in the practice room and allows you to see one of his favorite practice formats.

    This DVD is an essential tool for novice wrestling coaches or experienced coaches looking to enhance their practices and give their wrestlers the edge they need.

    This series of videos was produced by Championship Productions in association with AAU (The Amateur Athletic Union).

    67 minutes. 2013.



    YWVD-04220B: with Greg Strobel, Distinguished member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame (2012);
    former Lehigh University Head Coach; USA Wrestling's 2010 Man of the Year; '03-'04 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 4x EIWA Coach of the Year; 2000 US Olympic Team Coach; 2x NCAA Champions (and 3x All American) at Oregon State

    Create better and more efficient practices through proper drilling.

    Former Olympic Coach Greg Strobel delivers a video packed with over 30 drills that coaches of all levels can use to get the best out of their wrestlers and their teams. His philosophy on drilling is that precise drilling creates good habits on the mat.

    In this video you will discover how to get your wrestlers to drill to perfection. Coach Strobel uses a step-by-step approach to drilling, paying attention to every detail. He explains the importance of detailed drilling to help your wrestlers to learn the correct positions and techniques they need to succeed. He gives you an assortment of drills that you can easily implement into your practice sessions.

    Coach Strobel discusses the various types of drilling and how each kind can benefit the wrestler with various examples of each. You will learn several drills within each drill type and when to implement them within your practices, which allows you to adjust your drilling to match the intensity or volume of your practice. These different types of drilling include:

    • Open Drilling - Unstructured wrestler's choice that is perfect for observation by the coach.
    • Structured Drilling - Controlled drilling to work on specific focus.
    • Situation Drills - Drills or live wrestling situations designed to work wrestlers from different positions.
    • Match Situation Drilling - Live wrestling out of different time and score scenarios.
    • Specific Drills to Fix or Teach - The best drills to fix problems.
    Many of the drills that coach Strobel shows help build muscle memory so that technique becomes instinct and you can wrestle drill matches that simulate match conditions. These drills will teach your wrestlers how to hand fight, counter, escape, ride, fight off their back, scramble, create space, keep from wrist control and much, much more. These simple-to-teach drills will help your wrestlers master moves they once struggled with, giving them more confidence to succeed during competition. In no time, they will be on their way to becoming better, more refined wrestlers.

    This DVD will minimize learning curves, give you and your wrestlers more confidence before entering a match and provide an edge over your opponents.

    This series of videos was produced by Championship Productions in association with AAU (The Amateur Athletic Union).

    70 minutes. 2013.



    YWVD-04220C: with Tom Koch, Strength and Conditioning Coach for Lehigh Valley Athletic Club, former Lehigh University Assistant Coach, EIWA Champion ('96) at Lehigh

    When coaching the developing wrestler, strength & conditioning is vital to their success. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to see the strength and conditioning philosophy of one of the most storied wrestling programs in the entire country.

    Lehigh has always been known for their exceptional strength and conditioning and in this video, Tom Koch walks through the fundamentals of athletic training and demonstrates a myriad of exercises to help enhance your athlete's speed, power and conditioning.

    Coach Koch begins with an informative overview of the principals of athletic training and how it translates to training the developing wrestler. Koch then talks about the importance of the following concepts:

    • Speed - Changing direction and quickness
    • Power - Maximizing force quickly
    • Conditioning - Small short bursts, starting and stopping quickly
    Agility Ladder Training
    According to Coach Koch, the perfect tool for agility training in wrestling is the agility ladder. You'll see more than 15 different drills including variations for each, for linear movement, lateral movement, plyometrics and upper body workouts. These drills help develop foot speed, coordination and "fast twitch" muscle fibers, as well as condition your athletes. You'll also see how to adapt those same agility ladder drills to develop hand speed. Your team will be able to work the entire body using the same movements to develop footwork.

    Plyometric Training
    Koch demonstrates several plyometric exercises designed to increase your wrestlers' functional power. He discusses common misconceptions with plyometrics that can hinder an athlete's performance improvement. There are more than 20 exercises demonstrated by Coach Koch in this section of the video, including different types of pushups, box exercises, plyometric jumps and core strength with the medicine ball.

    These drills incorporate conditioning into their in strength building. This carries over perfectly to wrestling since many matches require both strength/power and strength endurance in order to be successful.

    Coach Koch demonstrates, with young athletes, how these workout drills can be extremely challenging and fun at the same time. Often times athletes don't even know that they are being trained due to the change of pace and fun in completing these exercises. These are exercises that can be done by any age athlete that will push their sports development to new heights.

    The use of non-traditional items within your gym will lend greatly to improving strength and body control. This video is a great tool for coaches, parents, and athletes who want to improve their strength and general body control!

    This series of videos was produced by Championship Productions in association with AAU (The Amateur Athletic Union).

    75 minutes. 2013.




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